talesof4chan:

Anon has found the answer to one of humanity’s biggest dillemas.talesof4chan.tumblr.com

This man is a genius

talesof4chan:

Anon has found the answer to one of humanity’s biggest dillemas.
talesof4chan.tumblr.com

This man is a genius

binary-shminary:

OH SNAP


Those aren’t a comparison of the same statistic. That’s just the number of honor killings alone; not the number of times that a man in Pakistan beats his wife to death. If you compared those numbers per capita to the U.S. I’m sure the number in Pakistan is worse.

binary-shminary:

OH SNAP

Those aren’t a comparison of the same statistic. That’s just the number of honor killings alone; not the number of times that a man in Pakistan beats his wife to death. If you compared those numbers per capita to the U.S. I’m sure the number in Pakistan is worse.

(via steamedhams)

kaylahraquel:

letter-experiment:

Largest amount of swag I have ever witnessed


Goals

kaylahraquel:

letter-experiment:

Largest amount of swag I have ever witnessed

Goals

(Source: 4gifs)

My life

My life

(Source: bobbymoynihans, via c00tiebreath)

africxn-phxraoh:

jndvdt:

Rise Against’s ”I Don’t Want To Be Here Anymore” music video.

 

The world has been at peace for 8% of Recorded History.

(via bluesey)

Senator Jim Webb received the Navy Cross for actions on July 10, 1969. The citation read:

“ The Navy Cross is presented to James H. Webb, Jr., First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On July 10, 1969, while participating in a company-sized search and destroy operation deep in hostile territory, First Lieutenant Webb’s platoon discovered a well-camouflaged bunker complex that appeared to be unoccupied. Deploying his men into defensive positions, First Lieutenant Webb was advancing to the first bunker when three enemy soldiers armed with hand grenades jumped out. Reacting instantly, he grabbed the closest man and, brandishing his .45 caliber pistol at the others, apprehended all three of the soldiers. Accompanied by one of his men, he then approached the second bunker and called for the enemy to surrender. When the hostile soldiers failed to answer him and threw a grenade that detonated dangerously close to him, First Lieutenant Webb detonated a claymore mine in the bunker aperture, accounting for two enemy casualties and disclosing the entrance to a tunnel. Despite the smoke and debris from the explosion and the possibility of enemy soldiers hiding in the tunnel, he then conducted a thorough search that yielded several items of equipment and numerous documents containing valuable intelligence data. Continuing the assault, he approached a third bunker and was preparing to fire into it when the enemy threw another grenade. Observing the grenade land dangerously close to his companion, First Lieutenant Webb simultaneously fired his weapon at the enemy, pushed the Marine away from the grenade, and shielded him from the explosion with his own body. Although sustaining painful fragmentation wounds from the explosion, he managed to throw a grenade into the aperture and completely destroy the remaining bunker. By his courage, aggressive leadership, and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Webb upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.”

This was the program from the speech I saw earlier today at the UC Berkeley law school. Not only was the general’s personal story and insight amazing, but it’s also emblematic of one of the biggest issues of our time. This school just keeps blowing my mind with what’s made available to me.

This was the program from the speech I saw earlier today at the UC Berkeley law school. Not only was the general’s personal story and insight amazing, but it’s also emblematic of one of the biggest issues of our time. This school just keeps blowing my mind with what’s made available to me.

There have been gay military veterans for at least as far back as there was photography, despite the long-standing prejudices of homophobes. UC Berkeley.

There have been gay military veterans for at least as far back as there was photography, despite the long-standing prejudices of homophobes. UC Berkeley.